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Guide To S550 Mustang Engines

Kevin Cassar
May 1, 2020

Since the inception of the S550 Mustang back in 2015, this generation was an immense leap forward in style, performance, and handling. For the first time, a Mustang came equipped with IRS (Independent Rear Suspension). What this correlates to is the horsepower can be better handled not just in a straight line, but around corners. Every Mustang has always pushed the standard on how engine performance is delivered to maximize the experience and potential. The S550 is no exception to this rule, just like the S197 that came before, there was something new to behold in engine performance.

Think of a Mustang engine as a beating heart of the namesake it represents. The motor in a Mustang is everything since it is what creates the sound, experience, and theatre of an American icon. Ever since Ford and Shelby got together to take the Mustang from mule to racehorse, the fabled story of legendary Mustang performance came to be with iconic engines such as the infamous 427 V8, Boss 302 V8, Boss 429 V8, and high-revving 289 V8. All of these engines are what continues in the foundation for the performance engines found in today’s modern S550 Mustang.

Want to know everything there is to know about your 2015-present Mustang engine? Well, you’re in luck because Steeda has you covered with a comprehensive guide you will find below!



"Cyclone" 3.7L Ti-VCT V6 2.3L EcoBoost I4 Turbo Gen II “Coyote” 5.0L Ti-VCT V8 5.2L “VooDoo” Ti-VCT V8 Gen III “Coyote” 5.0L Ti-VCT V8 5.2L “Predator” Supercharged Ti-VCT V8


Mustang S550 Cyclone V6

"Cyclone" 3.7L Ti-VCT V6

Following the success of the S197 Mustang, Ford understood how successful the Cyclone V6 had become over within the Mustang lineup. Therefore they saw no reason to discontinue when the changeover occurred for the S550. Unlike V6 Mustang models of the past, the Cyclone engine has to be the most advanced of all-modern Ford V6 variants. Engineering alongside the mighty "Coyote" V8, it carries engine technology in the framework such as Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing), piston cooling jets, aluminum cylinder heads, aluminum block, and roller finger followers for razor-sharp valve action.

With all of this combined, it made for a base Mustang engine that had never been seen before in history. Each Mustang Cyclone made an astonishing 305 horsepower and 285 LB/FT of torque. Combined with a lightweight aluminum block that is 41 pounds lighter than the previous 4.0L V6 found in the 2005-2010 models, this aids in helping the Cyclone achieve fantastic fuel economy of up to thirty miles per gallon, compared to the 4.0L V6, this was a true testament to Ford's innovation and engineering.

Mustang enthusiasts who own a Cyclone will more often than not decide to opt for a centrifugal supercharger to increase the already stout powertrain to almost 500 plus horsepower. For even more power, owners will add exhaust, cold air intake, and a tune.

You can find the "Cyclone" V6 Engine in the following Mustangs:

  • 2015-2017 Base Model Mustangs

Mustang Cyclone V6 Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Aluminum block and heads
Intake Manifold Composite shell-welded with runner pack
Exhaust Manifold Cast Iron
Valvetrain DOHC (Dual Overhead Cam), 4V Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing)
Valve Diameter/Lift Intake 37mm/10mm, Exhaust 31mm/9.7mm
Pistons Cast aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged Steel
Ignition Distributor-less with coil on plug design
Bore X Stroke 3.76 X 3.41 in./95.5 X 86.7mm
Displacement 227 Cubic Inches/3.7L
Compression Ratio 10.5:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 305 @ 6,500 RPM
Torque 285 LB/FT of Torque
Recommended Fuel 87 Octane
Fuel Delivery Sequential Multiport Electronic Fuel Injection
Oil Capacity Six Quarts 5W-20 w/Oil Filter 10K Mile Intervals
Fuel Economy 19 City/28 Highway/22 Combined (Automatic) 17 City/28 Highway/21 Combined (Manual)


EcoBoost Mustang Engine

2.3L EcoBoost I4 Turbo

Unlike its V6 counterpart, everyone wondered how could a little four-cylinder go up against the framework that all base Mustang engines have been for quite some time. Simply put, it is called EcoBoost technology; being turbocharged, it doesn't need to sacrifice power and efficiency in the namesake of performance. The 2.3L EcoBoost debuted alongside the Cyclone V6 back in 2015, with the launch of the S550 Mustang generation.

Since that time, Mustang enthusiasts from all across the world have realized how potent a turbocharged four-cylinder can be. If you don't recall back in the 1980s, there was another Mustang that came equipped with the same formula. The SVO Fox Body Mustang was the first Mustang ever to be fitted with an inline four-cylinder engine. At the time, Ford realized that to keep sales going; they would have to fill the void in a segment that was mostly dominated by big V8 engines. Amongst many customers within the market, they were looking to have a sporty muscle car without the sacrifice of fuel efficiency and power.

Many enthusiasts over the years who have built EcoBoost engines with forged internals, larger turbocharger, and fuel system have seen upwards of over 500 horsepower depending on supporting modifications such as exhaust, downpipe, and a tuner. If one thing modern technology has shown enthusiasts, it is not just about engine displacement anymore.

Mustang EcoBoost 2.3L High Performance

Mustang EcoBoost High Performance Package

After five years of four-cylinder turbocharged technology in the S550 Mustang, Ford knew it was time to take things up a notch to keep up with the competition in the segment. Just recently, Ford introduced a High-Performance Package for the EcoBoost Mustang; this package produces a staggering 330 horsepower and 350 LB/FT of torque. It is the most potent four-cylinder American sports car on the market you can buy today. Customers can choose to equip this package with either a 6-speed manual transmission or 10-speed automatic.

Engineering began with swapping out the base EcoBoost engine with the Focus RS 2.3L I4. The goal was simple, to be the lightest and nimblest four-cylinder sports cars amongst its rivals in the marketplace. Each has seen a 0-60 run within the mid-four-second range on premium 93 octane fuel, with a top speed increasing to 155 mph, this is a 10 mile per hour gain over the base 2019 EcoBoost engine, and this is a total of 34 mph over the base EcoBoost engines from 2015-2018. This little four-cylinder is a beast to be reckoned with amongst the Mustang lineup and its rival counterparts.

You can find the 2.3L EcoBoost Engine in the following Mustangs:

  • 2015-2017 Base & Premium Mustang
  • 2018-Present Base & Premium Mustang
  • 2020 High-Performance Package EcoBoost Mustang

Mustang 2.3L EcoBoost Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Aluminum block and head
Intake Manifold Composite shell-welded with runner pack
Exhaust Manifold Three-port integrated into aluminum head
Valvetrain DOHC (Dual Overhead Cam), 4V Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing)
Valve Diameter/Lift Intake 31mm/8.31mm, Exhaust 30mm/7.42mm
Pistons Cast aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged steel
Ignition Distributor-less coil on plug design
Bore X Stroke 3.45 X 3.7 in./87.55 X 94mm
Displacement 140 Cubic Inches/2.3L
Compression Ratio 9.5:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 310 @ 5,500 RPM
Torque 320 LB/FT of Torque
Recommended Fuel 87 Octane
Fuel Delivery Direct Injection
Oil Capacity Six Quarts 5W-30 w/Oil Filter 10K Mile Intervals
Fuel Economy 21 City/32 Highway/25 Combined (Automatic) 22 City/31 Highway/ Combined (Manual)


Mustang Gen II Coyote

Gen II “Coyote” 5.0L Ti-VCT V8

Since the unveiling of the now legendary "Coyote" 5.0L V8, Ford turned the world upside down on modern American V8 performance. Like the 5.0L V8 during the Fox Body Mustang era, it too was way ahead of its time in engine technology and performance capability. The same can be said about the Coyote as well; just like the first generation, the Coyote still retains a DOHC (Dual Overhead Camshaft) and Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing). Previously this technology could only be seen in high-end European exotic cars such as Ford's arch-rival Ferrari.

After the success of the 2012-2013 Boss 302 Mustang, Ford was able to discover an abundance of technology created during the development of the "Roadrunner" 5.0L engine. What Mustang engineers found is an ability to incorporate characteristics found in the Boss 302s powerplant into the second generation coyote—resulting in more power, airflow, and efficiency throughout the RPM range. Power increased to 435 horsepower and 400 LB/FT of torque coming very close to the Roadrunner's power numbers.

Changeover components in the Gen II Coyote are as follows:

  • Larger intake & exhaust valves
  • Revised intake & exhausts camshafts
  • Stiffer valve springs to handle the RPM range of up to 7,500
  • New cylinder head castings
  • Forged connecting rods from the Boss 302
  • Redesigned pistons
  • New composite intake manifold
  • New variable intake camshaft-phasers

You can find the Gen II Coyote engine in the following Mustangs:

  • 2015-2017 Base & Premium Mustang GT
  • 2016-2017 Mustang GT California Special

Mustang Gen II Coyote 5.0L Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Aluminum block and head
Intake Manifold Composite shell-welded with runner pack and charge motion control valves
Exhaust Manifold Stainless Steel Tubular Headers
Valvetrain DOHC (Dual Overhead Cam), 4V Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing)
Valve Diameter/Lift Intake 37.3 mm/13 mm, Exhaust 31.8 mm/13 mm
Pistons Cast aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged steel
Ignition Distributor-less coil on plug design
Bore X Stroke 3.63X 3.65 in./92.2 X 92.7mm
Displacement 302 Cubic Inches/5.0L
Compression Ratio 11.0:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 435 @ 6,500 RPM
Torque 400 LB/FT of Torque
Recommended Fuel 87 Octane
Fuel Delivery Sequential Multiport Fuel Injection
Oil Capacity Six Quarts 5W-30 w/Oil Filter 10K Mile Intervals
Redline 7,250 RPM


Shelby VooDoo 5.2L Engine

5.2L “VooDoo” Ti-VCT V8

Throughout the landscape of American high-performance V8 engines, there are only a few predecessors that came close to the 5.2L “Voodoo” engine in Ford history. Only one engine comes to mind, in the legendary 427 V8 used in the almighty Ford GT MKII in the mid-1960s in order to beat Ferrari. Like the 427, the VooDoo is an engine that demands respect and attention. That is where the similarities only begin; both are naturally aspirated, can rev incredibly high over 7,500 RPM, AND creates an immense amount of power effortlessly.

The VooDoo derives its architecture from its Coyote sibling in the Mustang lineup. To produce a whopping 526 horsepower and 429 lb/ft of torque, engineers had to create an engine that is uncharacteristically not found in models of Mustangs in recent years. Each motor uses a flat-plane crankshaft, instead of the typical cross-plane crankshaft found in all Mustang GT 5.0L models. Flat-plane crankshafts allow for a different engine firing order, which results in the engine and valvetrain to have a much higher RPM range vs. a cross-plane crank. This results in the VooDoo engine allowing for the highest RPM redline in Ford history; a staggering 8,250 RPM. The Voodoo features an exhaust note that is very exotic, to the likes of its European rival counterparts.

You can find the 5.2L Voodoo engine in the following Mustangs:

  • 2015-Present Shelby GT350
  • 2015-Present Shelby GT350R

Shelby GT350 Engine Cutaway

Shelby GT350 Voodoo Engine Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Aluminum block and heads
Intake Manifold Composite shell with scroll design and charge motion control valves
Exhaust Manifold Tubular stainless steel headers
Valvetrain DOHC (Dual Overhead Cam), 4V Ti-VCT (Twin Independent Variable Camshaft Timing)
Valve Diameter/Lift Intake 31mm/8.31mm, Exhaust 30mm/7.42mm
Pistons Cast aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged aluminum
Ignition Distributor-less with coil on plug design
Bore X Stroke 3.70 in. x 3.66 in. (94.0 mm x 93.0 mm)
Displacement 315 Cubic Inches/5.2L
Compression Ratio 12.0:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 526 @ 7,500 RPM
Torque 429 LB/FT
Recommended Fuel 93 Octane
Fuel Delivery Port fuel injection with twin high-flow pumps
Oil Capacity 10 quarts 5W-50 full synthetic with filter (5,000-mile service interval, 3,000 for heavy use)
Redline 8,250 RPM


Gen III Coyote Mustang Engine

Gen III “Coyote” 5.0L Ti-VCT V8

In 2018, Ford unleashed the mid-cycle refresh for the S550 Mustang. At first, enthusiasts were a little skeptical with the front end design being that it was very edgy and uncharacteristic of past Mustang generations. At the same time, Ford realized it would be a fantastic opportunity to push Coyote 5.0L Engine technology to the next level with the third generation. Taking lessons learned from the GT350 Voodoo engine, engineers discovered if they boosted the compression ratio, built a more durable bottom end, and added direct/multi-port fuel injection; there could be significant gains across the power curve.

Upon initial launch, many Mustang enthusiasts were astounded by the incredible new layout that the Gen III Coyote had to offer vs. its previous first two versions. Ford was able to create an all-new Coyote engine efficiently by delivering more fuel, more air, and spark to the combustion champer in order to provide a more linear power curve. Over two years later, since its debut, Mustang fans everywhere have been able to take the Gen three to new heights just by adding a supercharger or twin-turbo system. Power numbers on a stock Coyote bottom have been seen well over 1,000 rear-wheel horsepower.

You can find the Gen III Coyote engine in the following Mustangs:

  • 2018-Present Mustang GT
  • 2019-2020 Mustang Bullitt

Mustang Gen III Coyote Engine Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Cast aluminum block and head with plasma transferred wire arc cylinder liners
Intake Manifold Composite shell with scroll design and charge motion control valves
Exhaust Manifold Tubular stainless steel headers
Valvetrain DOHC, four valves per cylinder, twin independent variable camshaft timing
Valve Diameter/Lift Intake 31mm/8.31mm, Exhaust 30mm/7.42mm
Pistons Cast aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged aluminum
Ignition Distributor-less with coil on plug design
Bore X Stroke 3.63 in. x 3.65 in. (93.0 mm x 92.7 mm)
Displacement 302 Cubic Inches/5.0L
Compression Ratio 12.0:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 460 @ 7,500 rpm
Torque 420 LB/FT of Torque
Recommended Fuel 93 Octane
Fuel Delivery Dual-fuel, high-pressure direct injection and low-pressure port fuel injection
Oil Capacity 10 quarts 5W-20 with filter (10,000-mile service interval)
Redline 8,000 RPM


Shelby GT500 Predator Engine

5.2L “Predator” Supercharged Ti-VCT V8

No matter what angle you look at the Mustang lineup, the Shelby GT500 is the king of the road on any given day. Just as Carroll Shelby designed the 1967 GT500 to be an absolute beast on and off the track, the all-new 2020 Shelby GT500 is no different to this formula. Ford set out to build the most potent street Shelby in company history. Code-named “Predator,” the 5.2L supercharged V8 makes a mind-shattering 760 horsepower and 625 LB/FT of torque. Don’t think this engine is built for only straight-line speed; it helps the GT500 carve corners in some of the most dramatic ways.

Before the GT500s launch, Ford teased enthusiasts with many different specs such as horsepower, engine displacement, and power efficiency. Once revealed to the masses, Shelby fans everywhere discovered this engine is the most potent mass-produced supercharged engine in the world, that is something to be said for amongst its competitors. Right now, GT500 owners across America are now able to turn up the supercharger boost to eleven. With some GT500s capable of 1,000 plus horsepower with a simple tune, exhaust, and smaller supercharger pulley upgrade. This new Cobra is ready to take a bite out of the competition now and for years to come.


Shelby GT500 Predator Engine Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Cast aluminum block and head with plasma transfer wire arc cylinder liners
Intake Manifold Cast aluminum with integrated supercharger and CAE designed NVH features
Exhaust Manifold Tubular stainless steel headers
Valvetrain DOHC, four valves per cylinder, twin independent variable camshaft timing
Valve Diameter/Lift Intake, 38.3 mm/14 mm; exhaust, 32.5 mm/14 mm
Pistons Forged aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged micro-alloyed steel
Ignition Distributor-less with coil-on-plug
Bore X Stroke 3.70 in. x 3.66 in. (94.0 mm x 93.0 mm)
Displacement 315 Cubic inches/5.2L
Compression Ratio 9.5:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 760 @ 7,300 RPM
Torque 625 ft.-lbs. @ 5,000 rpm
Recommended Fuel 93 Octane
Fuel Delivery Port fuel injection with twin high-flow pumps
Oil Capacity 11.5 quarts 5W-50 full synthetic with filter (5,000-mile service interval, 3,000 for heavy use)
Redline 7,500 RPM


GT500 Predator Infographic


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Image Credit: Ford Motor Company, Ford Performance




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