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Guide To F-150 Raptor Engines

Kevin Cassar
May 21, 2020

Chances are if you’re an off-road enthusiast, you already know about the Baja factory beast in the Ford F-150 Raptor. If not, you must be living under a rock or at least crawling over one somewhere in the desert. To create this dirt king, Ford used the F-150 architecture as a base to develop a prototype for the SVT Raptor. Debuting at the 2008 SEMA show in Las Vegas, Nevada, as a concept, it took the automotive industry by storm as no manufacturer among the big three had ever attempted to build a factory Baja 1000 capable truck.

Leading up to job one, Ford looked to their SVT (Special Vehicle Team) engineers to come up with ingenious solutions to build a Baja capable F-150. With their vision clear, engineers sought to industry leader FOX Racing to help create the first-ever factory internal triple-bypass shocks and suspension to give the Raptor trophy truck-like suspension travel. Combined with stiffer upper and lower control arms, BFGoodrich all-terrain thirty-five inch tires, and a six-inch wider track, helped the Raptor become the instant legend we all know and love today.

In its 2010 debut, Ford started offering the Raptor with the tried and true 5.4L 24V V8 engine with plans to engineer a King Kong size 6.2L V8 to give the Raptor its much-needed muscle to conquer the desert floor. Since then, engineers have been hard at work every year, ensuring the Raptor stays at the top of the food chain among factory-built Baja capable trucks. After its three year hiatus in 2017, the Raptor returned, but this time dropping the SVT nameplate for Ford Performance. Only this time, a new formula in engine design was implemented in the form of a high-output EcoBoost twin-turbo V6 engine. Whether you’re just driving to your local grocery store or need to tear up the trails, the Raptor has the arsenal of tools to get the job done.

Below you will find a comprehensive guide to get you up to speed on what is powering your Baja beast!

2010 Raptor 5.4L SOHC 24V V8 2010-2014 Raptor 6.2L SOHC 16V V8 2017-2020 Raptor 3.5L H/O EcoBoost V6

2010 SVT Raptor 5.4L V8

2010 Raptor 5.4L SOHC 24V V8

During the Raptor’s launch in 2010, every off-road and truck enthusiast was itching to get their hands on the latest creation from Ford and SVT. Using lessons learned from past F-150s, Ford knew it had to start with a powerplant that would hold up against any type of terrain that the Raptor would see. So SVT engineers turned to the tried and true 5.4L 24V SOHC (Single Overhead Camshaft) V8 to create the muscle to power the Baja king through any desert, tundra, or forest. The Raptor came equipped standard with a SuperCab configuration along with this engine, which featured 310 horsepower and 365 lb/ft of torque. So out of the gate, the Raptor had some serious muscle to help it race through the desert and conquer any trails it faced very well.

Unfortunately, this engine was short-lived as Ford was putting in the works to engineer an engine that would be the largest F-150 engine ever to be injected into an engine bay from the factory. During its one year of production in the original 2010 Raptor, it would help pave the way for the improvements on the Raptor to come in the following years. Many automotive journalists said that it did not have the power it needed to push through harsh terrains such as deep mud, sand, and loose gravel. These reasons are why the engine was short-lived as it did not have enough muscle to tussle with the forces of mother nature.

You can find the 5.4L SOHC 24V V8 in the following Raptors:

  • 2010 Ford F-150 Raptor Supercab

Raptor 5.4L SOHC 24V V8 Engine Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Aluminum block with aluminum cylinder heads
Intake Manifold Composite style intake with motioned controlled runners
Exhaust Manifold Cast iron headers
Valvetrain SOHC, 24 valve (3V per cylinder)
Pistons Forged aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged Aluminum
Ignition Distributor-less with coil-on-plug
Bore X Stroke 3.55 in. x 4.17 in.
Displacement 330 Cubic inches/5.4L
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 310 @ 5,000 RPM
Torque 365 ft.-lbs. @ 3,500 rpm
Recommended Fuel 93 Octane
Fuel Delivery Sequential multi-port fuel injection
Oil Capacity 7 quarts 5W-30 full synthetic with filter (5,000-mile service interval, 3,000 for heavy use)
Redline 6,000 RPM


6.2L Ford Raptor

2010-2014 Raptor 6.2L SOHC 16V V8

It wasn’t until the following year in 2011 where enthusiasts would see the Raptor truly take off amongst the automotive industry. At first, Ford didn’t think this type of performance truck would strike the hearts and souls of enthusiasts due to the successes of the Harley-Davidson and Lightning street trucks of the past. Little did they know how many F-150 buyers are hardcore off-road enthusiasts. During its launch, Ford had been hinting to many potential buyers of an optional 6.2L SOHC (Single Overhead Camshaft) V8 engine that would take the Raptor from viscous to deadly. At first, many consumers didn’t see where the value was in adding cost to the already pricey Raptor.

Ford ended up dropping the dated 5.4L SOHC 24V V8 engine in 2011, in exchange for the BOSS 6.2L V8, also known as the “Hurricane” engine to become the only engine within the first-generation Raptor. Joining the Raptor was a choice of a SuperCrew four-door cab instead of just the SuperCab variant. By offering a Supercrew option, this better-suited buyers as not everyone is going to be off-roading or prerunning daily. Luckily, Ford hit a home run with the 6.2L V8 because after consumers started experiencing the raw power and torque coming from all 379 cubic inches, it proved that it was far superior in every way to the outgoing V8. Producing an extra 101 hundred horsepower and 64 more lb/ft of torque, SVT engineers gave what the Raptor needed to blast through the desert like a Baja trophy truck.

From there on, Ford continued to improve the Raptor every year by giving it better suspension, revised FOX Racing shocks, advanced traction control, and new technology components. Putting all of these components combined, Ford put the Raptor as the top of the food chain among all its competitive counterparts from Ram and Chevrolet. To further enhance the performance of the first-generation Raptor, owners will add a performance exhaust system, cold air intake, custom tuning, and upgraded upper/lower control arms.

You can find the 6.2L SOHC 16V V8 in the following Raptors:

  • 2010 Ford F-150 Raptor Supercab (Optional)
  • 2011-2014 Ford F-150 Raptor Supercab
  • 2011-2014 Ford F-150 Raptor Supecrew

Raptor 6.2L SOHC 16V V8 Engine Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Cast iron block and aluminum cylinder heads
Intake Manifold Composite With Charged Motion Runner Valves
Exhaust Manifold Tubular cast headers
Valvetrain SOHC (single overhead cam), VCT (variable camshaft timing), roller rocker shaft, 2 valves per cylinder
Pistons Forged aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged Aluminum
Ignition Individual coil-on-plug
Bore X Stroke 4.015" in. x 3.74in.
Displacement 379 Cubic inches/6.2L
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 411 @ 5,500 RPM
Torque 434 ft.-lbs. @ 4,500 RPM
Recommended Fuel 93 Octane
Fuel Delivery Sequential multi-port fuel injection
Oil Capacity 7 quarts 5W-30 full synthetic with filter (5,000-mile service interval, 3,000 for heavy use)
Redline 6,500 RPM


EcoBoost Gen 2 Raptor

2017-2020 Raptor 3.5L H/O EcoBoost V6

After its three year hiatus from the F-150 lineup, enthusiasts were wondering when Ford would return the Raptor to take over the off-road truck market once again. Leading up to 2017, Ford Performance engineers were hard at work, developing a worthy successor to the first-generation that became an instant legend amongst the off-road truck market. To make this happen effectively, the Ford Performance team realized how successful the second-generation 3.5L Twin-Turbo EcoBoost had become combined with the military-grade all-aluminum in the all-new F-150 architecture.

After years of development and engineering, Ford had come up with a high output version of the exceedingly fruitful 3.5L EcoBoost V6. Using performance calibration, revised Borg-Warner turbochargers, and an anti-lag system, Ford Performance engineers pulled 450 horsepower and 510 lb/ft of torque out of the engine. From a displacement standpoint, it is crazy to think that engineers could pull out this much torque from a V6 of this nature. At first, enthusiasts were not happy to see a V6 in the Raptor as many owners are purest in the traditional truck formula.

Upon its initial launch in 2017, many enthusiasts were captivated by the larger body, wider track, improved triple-bypass FOX Racing shocks, and upgraded off-road technology integrated into the package. All these features made a substantial impact on potential buyers, which helped them look past the V6 engine platform. Once driven enthusiasts were shocked at the amount of low-end torque, the Raptor put down to the ground at only 3,500 RPM.

To increase performance, many enthusiasts will add various components such as an upgraded intercooler, reservoir triple-bypass racing shocks, performance exhaust, pre-runner bumpers, and a custom tune. All of these combined will take the Raptor to new levels of off-road performance challenging many purpose-built Baja 1000 trucks. The second-generation Raptor will outperform the first-generation in almost every way except the exhaust note!

We are looking forward to what the potential third-generation Raptor will be among the 2021 Ford F-150 lineup. Stay tuned to all of Steeda's social media for the latest news.

You can find the 3.5L Ti-VCT 32V EcoBoost V6 in the following Raptors:

  • 2017-2020 Ford F-150 Raptor Supercab
  • 2017-2020 Ford F-150 Raptor Supercrew

Raptor 3.5L H/O EcoBoost V6 Engine Specs

Measurement Technical Specification
Configuration Aluminum block, aluminum cylinder heads
Intake Manifold Composite with charged motion runners
Exhaust Manifold Tubular stainless steel headers
Valvetrain DOHC, 32 valve (4v per cylinder), roller finger follower
Pistons Forged aluminum
Connecting Rods Forged Aluminum
Ignition Distributor-less with coil-on-plug
Bore X Stroke 3.64 in. x 3.41 in.
Displacement 213 Cubic inches/3.5L
Compression Ratio 10.0:1
Engine Control Sytem PCM
Horsepower 450 @ 5,000 RPM
Torque 510 ft.-lbs. @ 3,500 RPM
Recommended Fuel 93 Octane
Fuel Delivery Port fuel injection with direct injection
Oil Capacity 6 quarts 5W-30 full synthetic with filter (5,000-mile service interval, 3,000 for heavy use)
Redline 6,500 RPM



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Image Credit: Ford Motor Company, Ford Performance




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